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Letter to the Editor: Put College Back on Tax Rolls

Southampton man says state should sell SUNY Stony Brook Southampton for executive offices.

Dear Editor,

Where are the real civic minded people?

Are there any interested people in Southampton Town willing to volunteer to put the on the tax rolls?

We need to attract international and national companies to relocate their executive offices to the campus, and not for manufacturing.

There are many state assemblymen and state senators who would like to save the state of New York money by having this property off the Stony Brook loss sheet and on to the tax rolls.

These companies would bring high paying executive job salaries and personal to help run their companies. The housing market will pick up and the local businesses will also see a pickup in their businesses. Capitalism is great.

Bringing the college back to life is not the way to help Southampton’s economy. Another college or institute will not help the majority of the town residents. Property taxes help; jobs help. Jobs will pick up the real estate market — that’s what helps, not putting another tax exempt entity back in Southampton and calling it an institute.

Government-run and -owned facilities and tax exempt land owners do not help Southampton Town residents save money on their taxes. This is a country built on capitalism not an entitlement society.

We need real growth with companies paying good salaries. No more freebies or subordinate ventures by the state of New York paying no taxes on their property. We need to bring in the real created jobs, no more parasites that live off the rest of us. Sell the college property at under the going real estate value and then have the companies pay the taxes and create jobs for the local populace. This is important.

This has been done in Atlanta, Georgia; South Carolina, Texas, Florida, North Carolina and the Dakotas, which have only 3.5 percent unemployment.

If you want to volunteer send me a letter to PO Box 3061, Southampton, NY 11969, and we will put Southampton Town back where it should be.

We will try and have a meeting as soon as possible. We want the voices of the majority not just a few people making decisions for us.

Edward Broidy
Southampton

Brendan J. O'Reilly (Editor) January 24, 2012 at 12:12 AM
Via Southampton Patch's Facebook page, Scott comments, "I'm certain the town can find many ways to pad the payroll with that tax revenue. Seriously, with the demand for high priced undergrad education in this country I can't believe an elite arts + sci college cannot thrive in a place like Southampton."
julie January 24, 2012 at 04:29 PM
Totally agreee with Scott's comment here. From day one of the announcement of the closure of that campus, its students said it was because certain business people wanted the property for themselves & their own money-making ventures, including selling it to the highest bidder & because Certain people saw the property as a valuable hot commodity that was only being wasted on a bunch of kids. And here it is in that letter. Exactly what the students said was the real reason they were being pushed out. So sad.
jennifer January 24, 2012 at 05:12 PM
SUNY should uphold their deal & reopen the campus to the 2500+ national & international students who would benefit from an exceptional educational environment. Marine Biology, Arts & Sciences, Entertainment, Education and a host of other majors, Southampton has a unique ecosystem & cultural connection to support various majors. Having students /faculty living there will infuse money into town during "off season" & provide additional funding to real estate market by renting/purchasing off campus housing. Do you really need another empty home or store front? Students/faculty will frequent town, work the summer to provide opportunity for camps in arts & athletics. A once thriving educational institution was brought down and slowly became the "black sheep" in LIU's system. Initially LIU had never expected the successful run Southampton had. With tremendous support from the Provost & later Chancellor of the college who put his own money into financing the school, the Southampton residents (transient) & non-supporters of the campus "won". But did they? It now sits empty, with resident halls filled with building materials waiting for the go ahead to rebuild. Former ECAC Champions in Athletics, Fulbright Scholars, Business owners, Educators, and many others are successful due to the education aquired at Southampton. Students graduate every year, new ones arriving each fall; a guarantee of money, opportunity, proper use of the facility & rebuilding of a once great academic institution
Peconic Sunset January 24, 2012 at 05:42 PM
Thank you Mr. Broidy for your interesting letter. I admit that I am in the dark about the "Stony Brook loss sheet" nor do I know who the State Assemblymen and Senators are who want Southampton off the loss sheet. You have alerted us to a risk in the political environment and I thank you for that. I am trained in policy sciences and prefer to assess the benefit : cost ratio of this educational institution and see if it is yielding the maximum value. Perhaps we need to re-evaluate the educational programs and focus to increase the benefit side of the equation and take action to reduce the cost side, but please don't throw the proverbial baby out with the bath water. I will reach out to Senator LaValle's office to ascertain the status of the Master Plan for Southampton College. Thank you for your kind offer to attend your meetings on the subject. I may want to share my findings with you.
Alan Rice January 27, 2012 at 11:51 PM
The next economic boom will be Green Industry; a wave that must be surfed in order to share the wealth to be reaped rather than leaving it all to the Chinese who have moved to corner this market . Fortunately, there are those in the community who have the foresight to recognize a think tank in the East End devoted to green issues will draw the intellectual expertise that will make the East End the Silicon Valley of Green. The East End also has immense people resources to help secure this boon to this area, not just by way of an embellishment of high end earners or by increased investment opportunities but also by way of a developing tax base that would ease the economic strains now placed on our communities. An academic institute that would serve to educate, to research and to host technical and political experts from across the globe will be a requirement demanded by green industries looking for a suitable base to set up business. Rather than condemn Southampton College to a derelict $78 million loss, recognize it as a golden investment opportunity to secure a clean money making industry for the region. To argue Southampton College should be lopped off from this community (the college was apparently one year away from paying for itself) because of the dubious argument that it placed a burden on the state is akin to lopping off an arm to ease its demand on the body: much harder to hunt and feed oneself from there. Alan Rice Sag Harbor
Tabitha Evans March 22, 2012 at 01:01 AM
As a current student, mother, and tax payer, I think the East End could really benefit from and expanded curriculum. Not only Marine Biology and the like. I believe it is too narrow to benefit the many who could. I often wonder why they made it an extension of Stony Brook, and not simply another SUNY school? A missing link in the SUNY Universities that has the potential to educate so many in technology, arts and science, and as some suggested, Law. I believe it is a disservice to the community.

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